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Tuesday, May 01, 2012

Summing Up


It's the end of April and my visit is soon coming to an end. Thursday morning, 'the good Lord willin' and the crick don't rise' I will be back in Southport and soon it will seem as though I'd never left. As I sit here typing away with 'Wheel of Fortune' in the background -- Oh my goodness, she won $100,000!

It is a good thing to get an injection of American life every year. I don't always enjoy it and a lot of the time I feel somewhat 'out of the loop', but it is where I grew up and it will always have some sort of hold on my psyche. Later on tonight I will start packing because tomorrow I have another task to take care of -- but more about that anon...not today.

When I get back to the UK I will be investigating the course of events I can take toward achieving my goal of citizenship. (Excuse me, but the television is on entertaining others -- did you know that Katherine Jenkins is competing in the American version of Strictly Come Dancing? She just danced the rumba to the Pacabel Canon... it seemed a bit odd) Yes, back to citizenship. I must investigate further The Man's investigations as written about here. I will also be writing about a different aspect of my journey toward this goal. For there was a long period of feeling estranged from my new country, when I felt very angry and felt that I would refuse to ever return. I am not sure exactly why I changed my mind. But something happened that made me look again with different eyes. Who knows what we will discover when I begin to write again about that time.

32 comments:

  1. Writing with House in the background here. :)
    I was only a few minutes ago thinking about the difference in house, home, and place. Each has its own value but I think I've concluded that place is the most important of all. Interesting that "House" is on isn't it if you care for a play for words, or names for that matter. This from a mere drifter.

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    1. I can from what you say that our minds work in the same rather quirky way -- from time to time, anyway ;-). It did take me a minute to figure out your use of the word 'House' in the first sentence though!! I've been contemplating on the word 'place' -- it's a good one!

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  2. You sound a little sad Broad...and perhaps that is as it should be since you will soon be leaving your 'roots' again. I guess Strictly Come Dancing is the UK version of our Dancing with the Stars? And yes, Katherine Jenkins is not only gorgeous to look at but a very good dancer as well. I think she's well in the running to win the prized mirror ball trophy. Have a safe trip back. Smiles - Astrid

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    1. Perhaps you are sensing something I wasn't really aware of, but is probably true. I was thinking 'thoughtful', but sad, might be more accurate.

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  3. "Lord willing and the crick don't rise." I love this phrase although I come from "creek" people. Sorry your trip is coming to an end, but I know good things are in your future.

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    1. Oh Stephen, I love your happy prophesy!

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  4. I am looking forward to reading your thoughts on the citizenship journey, and hope that the last few days of your trip back "home" are good. Take care. J

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    1. I am very happy today! It was very successful...

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  5. Just become an expert on Cricket, and your citizenship is guaranteed.

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    1. This is probably perverse, but I often escape the beastly summer heat by retreating into our cool stone French house and watching the cricket on BBC 2!

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  6. Braod, I think all the cricks have done their rising over here, so you should be safe enough.. -)

    Of course you feel a natural reluctance to leave. It's where your oldest roots are and your Mom's presence there is a constant link. Safe journey and I look forward to the next posts on your citizenship journey

    (PS Your link is to a permission-only page)

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    1. Yes, it looks like nice weather when I get back!

      Thanks for the heads up on the link -- it should be fixed!

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  7. In one way, it's exciting that you have this goal and get to change life so drastically. No doubt it would be stressful, though.

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    1. The change has been over 30 years, though -- older and wiser though!

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  8. Dancing the Rhumba to Pacabel's Canon... that fairly much sums up our American life in a nutshell! :-)

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    1. My point exactly, Sully! Now I need to correct my spelling of Rhumba... ;-)

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  9. Dear Broad, . . . as Perpetua said, about your reluctance to leave the United States, "It's where your oldest roots are and your Mom's presence . . . is a constant link." I've visited my roots here in Missouri--where I was born and raised--for three years now, and I find that it's taught me so much but that the time has come to go home to Minnesota. So I understand the plethora of feelings/emotions you are experiencing. Be gracious to yourself and know that all shall be well.

    I so look forward to learning more about your longing for citizenship in Great Britain.

    Peace.

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    2. I've had a couple of long sojourns in the States. Almost 2 years with my parents when we were helping them to sell their house and move into the place where my mother is now and a years that I spent in Washington State helping out my daughter-in-law when my son was studying medicine and was far away. Both times were good for me to experience and to realize that what is important is what you do with where you are.

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  10. I believe the citizenship is terribly hard. I took it once and failed it dismally.

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    1. Well, I discovered that if you are over 65 you don't have to take the test! I discovered this after I bought all the books -- it was on the first page I turned to!!

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  11. I think it is difficult in a way to be from one country and live in another – you don’t feel like you are from either one totally – I know I don’t. France has changed - I don’t follow the politics (even though I have been receiving many emails about that lately) and here, I just don’t fit that well. Maybe it is different for you.
    It was nice to be with your mother I am sure and she must have been so happy to see you. Have a safe trip home.

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    1. It was a long time before I felt really comfortable in the UK. But when I discovered that I could be a citizen of both countries I think it changed my perspective -- I didn't have to choose. I feel like an American (always) who has been lovingly adopted and been able to love back --

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  12. Changing citizenship is a very formal way of entering a new home (though, by now, it's not nearly so new). Perhaps you can do it without leaving your old one. I don't think I ever could. Change, that is. I have no reason to try.

    Hope your travels home go well.

    Blessings and Bear hugs.

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    1. As I said above, I am able to have dual nationality -- and that has made all the difference. Bear hugs right back to you, Rob-bear.

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  13. And you enjoy cricket...always thought you were a good egg!

    Unless there were great advantages I would not take up citizenship...one label is enough for me.

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    1. I want to make the commitment and I want to vote!

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  14. Only crick I know is the one in my neck.

    Cranky

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    1. I definitely like my 'crick' better than yours!

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  15. thank you for your kind words on my blog x

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  16. It must be a psychological and emotional adventure to belong to two countries. It reminds me of what happens when two people marry, and they have to adjust to one another's families. "But we don't do it that way," is still said thought and felt in our home from time to time, after 34 years of marriage.

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Receiving comments is a joy and I thank you all for taking the trouble and showing your interest. Makes me feel all gooey and stuff!